Fees and Frequently Asked Questions - Center for ADHD

Fees and Frequently Asked Questions

What are your fees?                                                                                                                    

The fee for individual sessions is $120.00 per 55-minute session.   The fee for an assessment which is required to participate in our programs is $120.00 which includes a review of testing reports, etc. in advance.   The fee for Social Thinking Groups and Lego Social Thinking groups is $70 per session. Tuition for social skills programs vary by program.   Payment is due at the time of service and can be made by cash, check or Venmo. Please note that Center for ADHD does not accept credit card payment.

 Payment is due at the time of service and can be made by cash, check or Venmo. Please note that Center for ADHD does not accept credit card payment.

Do you accept insurance?                                                                                                                 Center for ADHD is considered an out-of-network provider thus we do not accept or file insurance claims.  We can provide you with an invoice you can submit to your insurance provider.

Do you work with girls and young women?

Absolutely, only our social skills programs and Summer Travel Camp are specifically for boys.  

Why do you require individual sessions with new students before they can start in your groups?    

Any students who join our groups or programs are given the Social Thinking Dynamic Assessment in order for us to pinpoint their specific social learning needs.  Parents are present during this assessment.   Additionally, our programs are designed for students who already have a foundation in Social Thinking® core concepts.  The majority of the time we find that students have little to no understanding of these concepts, despite the fact they may have participated in social skills groups in school or outside of school.  We use these individual sessions to help students develop the foundation they need to participate successfully in our programs.  

Our How to Hang Out program is only open to students who are currently or who have participated in our Social Thinking Groups, Lego groups, executive function coaching or Summer Travel Camp. 

There seems to be a lot of social skills groups in the area.  What makes you unique?

What sets us apart from other social skills providers is our level of training and experience.  As one of the only clinicians in the Philadelphia area to have attended the Social Thinking Clinical Training program at the Social Thinking Clinic in San Jose, California Ryan has used Social Thinking since 2011 with great results.  He received a Social Thinking® Clinical Training Level 1 Certificate of Completion.

If you ask the students who attend our social skills programs what makes us different they will most likely tell you that our groups are enjoyable because we do not sit around a table and talk about social skills or practice scripted behaviors, we create a fun, relaxed learning environment so students are receptive to learning. We understand from first-hand experience the nuances of male-male communication and friendships, how to successfully be part of a male peer group and all of the “hidden rules” that exist when boys and young men spend time together.   

We understand from first-hand experience the nuances of male-male communication and friendships, how to successfully be part of a male peer group and all of the “hidden rules” that exist when boys and young men spend time together.   

Center for ADHD is the only practice in the Philadelphia area and Atlantic County, NJ that focuses on the ADHD population which is what draws many families to us, as well as the fact that we focus on helping boys who may not have any formal diagnosis yet present with social learning needs.  

As one of the only providers in the Philadelphia area to have attended the Social Thinking Clinical Training program at the Social Thinking Clinic in San Jose, California Ryan has used Social Thinking since 2011 with great results.  He received a Social Thinking® Clinical Training Level 1 Certificate of Completion.  Social Thinking is a methodology created by world-renowned expert Michelle Garcia Winner.  Learn more about Social Thinking

My 13-year-old does not have a formal diagnosis.  When he got to middle school he became more socially isolated.  He does fine in school and is an easy-going kid, he’s just very lonely.  Would he be appropriate for your social skills programs?

Definitely, what we teach is not diagnosis-specific.  Many of the students we work with who present with social anxiety but do not have any diagnosis.  Others fall into the “gray area” meaning they may have certain features such as difficulty with peer relationships or regulating their emotions but a formal diagnosis has not been established.   We approach every student as an individual, not a diagnostic label.  

How soon can we expect results?

It is very important to note that within the realm of building social, self-regulation and executive functioning skills there are no quick fixes. The work we do involves teaching skills that people with social learning challenges do not develop intuitively.  This is a significant amount of depth to this learning process.  With consistency, results will come slowly but steadily. 

Our son has both social and executive functioning needs?  Can you address both simultaneously?   

Yes but please understand we only address social executive functioning issues in our social skills programs.  Executive function treatment takes place individually, parents are usually included in these sessions so they can learn the language and strategies to help their child improve their executive functioning.  The executive functioning work we go focuses on two primary areas-conceptualizing or “feeling” time and improving nonverbal working memory.  

We tried social skills group in the past however our son did not generalize what he was taught and the other students in the group appeared to have more significant challenges than our son.  He desperately needs the help but doesn’t want a repeat of his past experience.  What can I tell him about your programs?

You can tell him that this will be a very different experience from other social skills groups he’s attended because we approach teaching social very differently.  Whether it’s a small group that we hold during the week or our How to Hang Out Programs we make our small groups and social skills programs are dynamic and fun.   We often find that our programs are the first time many participants felt comfortable sharing their feelings about their social learning challenges or social anxiety with other boys. Many boys participate in our programs throughout the year because they enjoy the camaraderie of being with similar-age peers who “get them”. 

Our son’s psychologist said he needs to have appropriate peer role models so he can improve his social skills. How can you teach social skills if you don’t have appropriate peer role models in your groups?

Anyone who struggles socially was born with some degree of weak social observational skills meaning they do not “pick up” or decode social information intuitively.  Despite what many parents and well-intended professionals believe someone cannot improve their social skills simply by being around peers with stronger social skills.  If peer modeling was effective then theoretically no one should have social difficulties beyond elementary school.  Improving social competency is a learning process that needs to be taught by someone who has had significant training and education in teaching social cognitive skill development.

Our 19-year-old daughter diagnosed with ADHD and Asperger’s went away to college this year.  She quickly fell apart and came home in November.   We are not sure if she has the independence and maturity to handle college.  Is this something that you work with?

We work with many students her age who struggle during their first year of college due to their social and executive functioning challenges. Our work will include both individual sessions and family sessions to help you learn how to help her improve her executive functioning and age-expected level of independence.

Our son with ADHD went to a social skills summer camp last summer and found it boring because it wasn’t active enough for him and he did not want to sit in a social skills group during the summer.

First and foremost our Summer Travel Camp is an active, nonacademic program. designed to help boys improve their executive functioning, independence, and social competency.   We do not play video games, go on computers or sit around in social skills groups at Summer Travel Camp  We are the only summer camp program in the Philadelphia area that focuses on building executive functioning and age-expected independent skills.  Please visit our Summer Travel Camp website for more information.

Our 17-year-old has been socially inappropriate with girls on social media.  Can you help him to learn how to read social cues when girls aren’t interested in him?

Yes, and it’s very important he learns this information as his actions can be misperceived. Teenagers with neurodevelopmental differences have the same hormones and interests as their typically developing peers.  They need to be taught how to manage their feelings appropriately, respect others boundaries and be safe when using social media.  The work we do in this area is based on providing age-appropriate information within a social learning context.   We work with parents so they learn how to convey their values around these topics.

Please contact us to set up an appointment.